We are all Prejudice

Racism, homophobia, sexism, ageism... PREJUDICE. 

These are all words that we are afraid to discuss. We are afraid because these words ignite intense emotions in all of us. However, it is essential that we have open, honest and nonjudgemental conversations about all forms of prejudice. 

If we are not discussing the prejudice around us, and even within us, how will we be able to progress?


When you envision the "All American couple," what do you see?


Have you ever had Prejudice Thoughts?

If you heard there was a terrorist threat, would you assume the suspect was Islamic?

Have you ever told someone they throw like a girl?

Are you afraid or uncomfortable when walking past the homeless?

When you imagine a drug dealer do you think of an African American or a Latino?

Do you get uncomfortable if you see someone of the same sex kiss?

Have you ever given a Middle Eastern a second look at an airport?

Would you be surprised if the CEO of a Fortune 100 company walked in and she was a woman?

When you envision the "All American couple," what do you see?


If he was white, would I have done the same? No. 


My Guilt of Prejudice

As someone who is passionate about human rights, I have never considered myself a racist, homophobic, sexist, or ageist. However, this doesn't mean that I don't have prejudice inclinations. 

I first realized my prejudice when I began my now four-year relationship. 

When my boyfriend and I started dating, I knew I had to tell my parents, but I also felt the need to ask for permission… Why did I need permission? Because I wanted to make sure that my family would be okay with me dating a black man.  

I told them his name and specified his race, then asked if that'd be a problem with my grandparents. Why did I feel the need to do this?

If he was white, would I have done the same? No. 

If I had started dating a white male named John, do you think I’d say to my parents, "hey, I started dated this great guy named John. He's white. Is that going to be a problem?"

I knew my parents would be okay with it, but I honestly wasn't sure if my grandparents would be accepting. My mom’s parents grew up in very Southern, white households and my dad’s parents grew up in very Catholic, Cuban households. I thought about the stereotypes that came along with their upbringings, instead of thinking about the people they are. I assumed the worst (through my prejudice thoughts).

The fact that I did something for the sheer reason that my boyfriend is black illustrates the fact that prejudice is still within us.

This does not mean I’m racist. This does not mean I’m a bad person. This simply shows that we continue to stereotype others and we continue to act based on these stereotypes. 


If we are not discussing the prejudice around us, and even within us, how will we be able to progress?


Admit it, to Change it

I know it's difficult to admit our wrongs. However, we cannot blame ourselves. We can only blame ourselves if we do not fight to overcome the prejudice that society teaches us. 

We are not born with prejudice thoughts. We are taught prejudice thoughts. And we can be untaught.

The first step is to admit it. The second step is to be aware of it. The last step is to change it. 

If we cannot accept our own prejudice inclinations, instead of being in denial, how will we be able to progress away from a society of discrimination?


I am grateful to be a part of a society that continues to progress. If I lived 50 years ago, I would not be able to legally marry the person I love.

Everyday we take a step forward and I feel blessed to be able to continue the march forward, walking hand and hand with person I love.

- KATIE